How to Migrate Exchange to Office 365: Step by Step

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Preparing your Exchange to Office 365 MigrationBefore you begin a migration, it’s important to make sure that the source environment you are migrating from is in a good state. If the Exchange environment you are running today isn’t healthy, then often that can serve as the motivator to move. After all, what can be an easier solution to bad day-to-day Exchange performance than moving to Office 365? Unfortunately, if you are experiencing day-to-day issues with Exchange, such as user issues accessing Exchange remotely, error messages and slow access times to mailboxes – or worse, database corruption – then moving to Office 365 will most likely be another source of trouble; not just for people accessing the environment you are trying to migrate from, but also when migrating as it’s likely…
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Don’t run your own Exchange Server!

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Came across great article by Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols. That happened after a security researcher who goes by the name Orange Tsai at security testing firm DEVCORE spotted a pair of Exchange Security holes in early January 2021. He tweeted this "might be the most serious RCE [remote code execution] I have ever reported!"Paired together, they're known as ProxyLogon (aka CVE-2021-26855), and they allow an attacker to easily bypass Exchange administration authentication and impersonate the admin. I'd call this about as serious as a heart attack for IT security. Adding insult to injury, these vulnerabilities have been present since at least Exchange 2010 rolled out the door. In short, every version of Exchange you're running in-house is vulnerable.Other security companies spotted the trouble, too, and found that hackers were already using it.…
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Window 10 Issues with latest updates for Printing

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How to fix the BSOD crashes when printing Even though Microsoft did not provide a workaround for Windows 10 devices affected by this issue, you can temporarily restore printing functionality by uninstalling the problematic cumulative update. You can uninstall the buggy updates by closing all applications, opening a Command Prompt, and entering the following command (replace the KB ID to match the cumulative update you want to remove): wusa /uninstall /kb:5000802 We also have this detailed tutorial for more help uninstalling Windows updates using the Control Panel or the Advanced Options feature.
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